Thursday, August 2, 2012

Bioaccumulation

Michelle Rozic 
"Bioaccumulation" by Michelle Rozic 

Artist Statement: 
Representational art affords a greater understanding of the everyday world by focusing in on moments to contemplate, inherently questioning what is real and what is imitation. Today these distinctions are blurring because of advances in science and technology. With copies developing at ever quickening rates, it becomes difficult to decipher what is original to nature.

Images of flora and fauna from Lake Michigan’s food web shed light on industries impact on local ecosystems. Bioaccumulation occurs as environmental contaminants accumulate in organisms during the cycle of producer, consumer, and decomposer. The contamination magnifies as predator eats prey, with those at the top of the food chain receiving the highest dose.

These representations bring to light acceptance of the reproduction as a stand in for the original – malformed animals for healthy – asking what is lost and what is gained by these evolutions.

Artist Bio:
I received my BFA in fine arts from the Columbus College of Art and Design and MFA in printmaking from Indiana University, Bloomington. Currently I am an assistant professor of art and printmaking area coordinator at California State University, Northridge. My work has shown throughout the U.S. and abroad. Recent projects include curating Edge of Life: Forest Pathology Art, a collaborative, invitational, art and forestry exhibit and accompanying catalog. In 2010 I spent time at the U.T. Dallas Central Trak artist residency creating work for Edge of Life.

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